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Justin Timberlake Knows How To Put On A Fu**ing Show: Recap

Sometimes the greatest way to say something is to...just perform, and that's exactly what Mr. Timberlake did. 

The arena went dark and the crowd roared. A light peaked through from behind the stage with smoke acting as a thin veil. Band members then ascended the stage instruments in hand digesting the energy from the anxious crowd ready to see the main act. And as the beat continued to build Justin Timberlake appeared.

Donning a black leather fringe jacket, a Biggie T-shirt and red-plaid button up, Mr. Timberlake opened his sold-out Madison Square Garden show with "Filthy," the lead single from his latest album (and fourth number one) Man of The Woods.

The nearly two-hour concert wasn't a show in which his band, the rambunctious and wildly talented Tennessee Kids or his half a dozen dancers did all the work. Silas' daddy, a showman who's earned his stripes since his Star Search days, effortlessly sang each song, played several instruments and dougied in a pair of brown Tinker Hatfield Jordan 3s three months shy of his 38th birthday.

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READ MORE: Verizon Teams Up With Justin Timberlake, Rae Sremmurd And More For Rewards Program

Man of The Woods may have earned mixed, and even lackluster reviews, but JT gave the crowd a healthy mix of what they wanted while still promoting his 16-track record. "Midnight Summer Jam" "Montana" and the album's title track received new life inside MSG while performing hits like Justified's "Cry Me A River," Future Sex Love Sound's, "LoveStoned/I Think She Knows" and an acoustic version of "What Goes Around Comes Around."

Yet the true might of Timberlake's musicality and showmanship came during his performance of "Mirrors." The mid-tempo love song of seeing one reflected in another has always been a come together moment for Timberlake, but it was during the performance where JT connected most intimately with fans. Whether single, dating, engaged, married or divorced, "Mirrors" when played in your headphones makes you believe. "Mirrors" when you see it performed live gives you air and hope.

For about 20 years Justin Timberlake has done his job. He's sang great songs and performed them to the best of his ability and Monday night at Madison Square Garden, he, like always, did what he's paid to do: he put on a show and for just two hours whatever woes we had were gone because Mr. Timberlake and The Tennessee Kids made it so.

READ MORE: The Making of Justin Timberlake's 'Man of The Woods' Album

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Nicky Jam: A Love Supreme

Love has neurological effects similar to those of cocaine. That’s what researchers from Syracuse University discovered in a study called "The Neuroimaging of Love.” According to science, falling in love triggers the same feeling of ecstasy experienced by people when they consume the drug.

What’s more, the withdrawal of love—or the emotional mourning that transpires after a serious breakup, for instance—can result in what is called Broken Heart Syndrome, also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy. The chest pain, characterized as sudden and intense, can rear its ugly head no matter how healthy one might be.

So when one of the biggest reggaeton singers to ever walk the planet tells me he resorted to the use of narcotics after an unexpected breakup during his formative years, I was all but flabbergasted. A 15-year-old Nick "Nicky Jam" Rivera Caminero had slipped into subterranean levels of depression in the face of cyclical family trauma, maternal abandonment and, ultimately, adolescent heartache.

“That’s when I touched cocaine for the first time,” and Nicky experienced a coke-induced euphoria that he spent the following 15 years trying to reproduce. Not long after recording his first album in 1994, ...Distinto A Los Demás, Nicky set on a path of years under the devilish grips of chronic addiction that saw him rise to teen fame in Puerto Rico and practically fade into oblivion by his mid-20s.

A considerably brief, yet successful stint as one-half of Los Cangris with reggaeton compatriot Daddy Yankee during the late 90s served as a precursor to Nicky’s solo career in the early 2000s. After the two parted ways professionally, Nicky went on to release a pair of studio albums, Haciendo Escante and Vida Escante between 2001 and 2004. By 2010, Nicky—now a struggling addict and self-described embarrassment of the Latin Caribbean music industry—relocated to Medellín, Colombia.

It was there in one of the most criminally notorious Latin American cities where Nicky Jam was able to produce a cadre of concerts and hit singles— “Voy A Beber,” “Tu Primera Vez,” and “Juegos Prohibidos,” to name a few—that helped revive his once-dwindling career. A city he feels indebted to for nurturing him when he most needed it, Medellín would also go on to backdrop the near overdose that almost took Nicky’s life before he made the radical (and perilous) decision of going clean.

In 2015, Nicky earned his first Latin Grammy Award in the category of Best Urban Performance with Enrique Iglesias for “El Perdón.” By 2017, Nicky had effectively kicked a deadly habit, resurrected his career, and from the ashes emerged with Fénix, an award-winning and Latin Grammy-nominated studio album that gathered collaborations featuring everyone from Sean Paul and J Balvin to El Alfa and Kid Ink.

Lead singles “El Amante” and “Hasta el Amanecer” would go on to receive their respective billions in views on YouTube, while a spot on Jaden Smith’s “Icon (Remix)” sparked the beginning of a collaborative relationship with the rapper’s father and Hollywood veteran, Will Smith. The Lawrence, Massachusetts born singer was tapped to play the official 2018 FIFA World Cup anthem, “Live it Up,” featuring Big Willie himself and Albanian singer-songwriter Era Istrefi.

In the same year, amid an afrobeat wave, Nicky released “X” with J Balvin, under Sony Music Latin. The song would go on to rule Billboard’s Latin Pop Airplay charts and, as of today, its accompanying music video has accumulated nearly 1.8 billion views on YouTube. In the time “X” took to climb the charts and make a home on the global dance floor, Nicky conjured thoughts with Will about possibly starring in Bad Boys For Life, the third installment of the classic movie franchise.

On January 17, 2020, Nicky then made a memorable return to the big screen alongside Will and on-screen partner-in-crime Martin Lawrence for the big-budget film. Playing one of the villains, Zway-Lo, Nicky’s dedication to his role went as far as him learning to perform a majority of his own stunts. Bad Boys For Life topped the box office for three straight weekends, raking in approximately $168 million in revenue and a total of $338 million worldwide. In the thick of it all, the father of four managed to drop a seventh studio album, Íntimo, and go on a U.S. tour to promote it.

To call Nicky’s story a comeback would be an understatement. Reggaeton’s reigning cupid is a dissertation on transnational redemption and personal resilience, despite falling victim to the social, psychological, physiological, and financial ramifications of inherited drug abuse.

On March 5, 2020, Nicky Jam will enjoy the homecoming of a lifetime, as he's honored with the Special Achievement Award at this year’s Premios Tu Música Urbano at the renowned José Miguel Agrelot Coliseum in Puerto Rico. His former Los Cangris partner Daddy Yankee is the only other recipient to have taken home the same accolade. The greater accolade will be receiving his honor in the company of the new leading lady in his life.

Love is, indeed, in the air.

But no amount of emotional ecstasy was going to see Nicky through to the other side; it was the deliberate act of love that would save him. “I knew I had to break these chains,” he says. “To fix my life and my family.”

Bring me to the moment that made you feel you needed drugs.

I think drugs sometimes make you think it can be the fix of a lot of your problems. The problem with drugs is that you go to drugs because in your mind you don't care anymore about dealing with the troubles that you have. You need something to make you feel good.

What were you feeling bad about?

I lost my mom. My mom wasn't with me. In my mind, I was abandoned by her since I was eight-years-old. Then I had a close girlfriend who left me when I was 15 years old. That’s when I touched cocaine for the first time. ‘Cause in my mentality, nobody was stable in my life. Nobody was sticking around. I felt a lot of betrayal from my own mom and from the girl I loved.

I thought, “Why am I going to take care of myself? My dad didn’t handle his drug problems. My mom did drugs too, so why not me?" I mean, I had drugs all around me, and the foundation of everything is your home. It's your family.

The absence of someone you loved, is that at the root of your past drug abuse?

Yeah, basically.

What was the moment you knew you had to stop and that your life needed radical change?

Years and years after the fact. Imagine, I started at 15 years old. So it was about 15 years later around the time I was 30. I said I gotta break these chains. I almost died from an overdose. I knew I had to break these chains. My mom was doing drugs, my dad struggled with drugs—I gotta break these chains! I needed to fix my life and my family. And that's what I did.

What were the key decisions you had to make in order for you to be successful in your sobriety?

Every pain that I had while I was trying to get clean made me not want to come back to this ever again. When you go cold and try to break drugs, you start to get back pains and bone pains and it's cold all the time. Every time I was going through that process I thought, “This is me breaking this evil, this curse. Am I really going back to this curse?” I had to go through it.

Anything that you have to suffer physically for in that way is the only red flag you need. That right there was letting me know, bro, I was a slave to drugs. I didn't want to be one anymore, so I said I'm not going back to that again. I want to live like normal people. I don't want to work so I can maintain an addiction. I'm seeing that I haven't even been successful enough just because I've been stuck in this cycle. I didn’t want the story of my family and my life to be drugs. I didn’t want to die that way.

One of my favorite songs by Kendrick Lamar is called “i.” That song let us know he was someone who battled with suicidal thoughts and urges. I like to think it’s a love song that he dedicated to himself and others like him. The song is about coming to this radical understanding that despite what the world has to say about you and where you come from, you are enough and worthy of all the good things life has to offer. Talk a little bit about your relationship with self when you were on drugs.

I felt like s**t. I felt like my soul was dead. I didn't care about nothing. It got to a point where I loved living that life, that miserable life and that darkness. I enjoyed hanging around people that lived that same life as well. I enjoyed not having responsibility. I enjoyed just hiding away from everything. You know, one of the big problems of leaving drugs is not just leaving drugs. It’s going back to the reality of what made you turn to drugs in the first place. All those skeletons that you have in the closet. That was my problem.

What else don’t people get about drug addiction?

Another thing people don't know about drugs is that you are a slave to your first high. That first high is always the best high in the world. You're always looking for that same reaction and you never find it. You find a lot of good ones, but never like that first one. You could say that is love at first sight. The [high] is like love at first sight. This is what you feel in a moment where you fall in love or something like that. It’s the only thing similar to having something so good in your life. But it’s not good. Not good at all.

In another interview, you talked about the first time you saw people dancing reggae. It was at one of your parents’ house parties, I believe. You also compared that moment to love at first sight. What was it about reggae that immediately caught your attention?

It was just the Caribbean, you know? In the Caribbean you will see people dancing reggae like normal, but in the States you didn’t really see that. Now, yes, but back in the 80s? It was just MC Hammer, Vanilla Ice, A Tribe Called Quest. People danced to hip-hop, obviously, but not so together. It wasn't really that grinding present. So when I saw people dancing reggae like that in Puerto Rico, and how sexy it was with that Caribbean vibe…

Is that what sparked your love for music?

Yes and no. My love for music began really when I saw the “Thriller” video by Michael Jackson. I remember seeing the premiere and I said I want to do this. I knew automatically when I saw Michael Jackson do “Thriller” as a little kid that I wanted people to fall in love with my music.

What other artists or genres did you consume that helped mold you into the artist you are today? Because you're lauded for bringing romance or the romantic flair to reggaeton.

Yeah, melody wise.

Are you a hopeless romantic?

I'm romantic, for sure, but it's also that I have a beautiful voice. My voice happens to work for that kind of material. So it's not only about my personality; I have a voice that helps create that type of music. What I did was take advantage of that.

I see.

But to answer your question, you can say a lot of music made me who I am. I'm talking about Prince, JAY-Z, Jenni Rivera. I’m talking about country and rock and so much other music that made Nicky Jam. I love that soul—that feeling. That’s what I’ve always been about.

Who taught you how to love?

Who taught me how to love?

Yes.

My kids taught me how to love. They’ve shown me what love really is. Colombia, believe it or not, showed me how to love. Because when I most needed love, they gave it to me. And God taught me love. Por encima de todo, God. God gave me that second opportunity in life where I really recognized that I was loved. I had my doubts.

What is your relationship with God?

God is everything. My respect to God is everything. I’m probably not the best church person in the world, but my connection with God is crazy. He knows that I have conversations with him. We can probably agree that I should maybe pray a little more. [Laughs] I get distracted a little bit because I got A.D.D., you know what I'm saying? But I love God.

You lit up when you mentioned your kids earlier. Who are they?

I have four kids. One is 18 years old and her name is Yarimar. My 17-year-old is Alissa. The 16-year-old is Luciana and my boy, Joe, is the youngest. He's 14 years old.

 

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A post shared by NICKY JAM (@nickyjampr) on Dec 22, 2019 at 8:40am PST

“La Promesa (La Calle)” is a standout cut for me off the new album. Considering some of the things you’re saying here, what was the writing process like?

That's the kind of song I wanted a lot of people to relate to. It’s saying I’m not giving up and I'm just going to do this. My situation is music, but somebody else can want to be a lawyer. Someone might want to be a journalist, a firefighter or a cop, who knows. But you’re saying, “I’m doing this.” I told my mom I'm not gonna stop. I'm gonna work my ass off and I'm gonna do what I'm gonna do so I don’t go back to that dark place. A lot of people hate me, but I see them. I see through them and I keep pushing anyway. I’m not stopping for nobody. That's the type of song that has a good vibe, but carries a strong message.

Would you say music helped save you?

Did music save me? Let me see, ‘cause I know a lot of people say it just to say it, right?

For sure.

Well, I gotta say that music did save me because it's really the only thing I had. I didn’t graduate from college, you know? I knew I had a voice and I knew I had the power to make people listen to me. So obviously music gave me hope and it gave me faith. It also made me want to be somebody and then it made me believe I was actually going to be somebody.

Music, then, also gifted you a world of people who love you, irrespective of your past or shortcomings.

It did. It gave me a platform, it gave me faith, and it gave me people that love me. Music saved me and my family, to be honest. Today my family lives good because of the music. Today my sister got her house because of the music. My mom got a home because of the music. My dad has his house because of the music. My kids got their college funds because of the music. Music saved the lives of my whole family.

What are your fears?

My fear today is not being with my kids when they need me. My fear today is that one of my kids will go through drugs. Because I know today the youth is crazy. My fear is not seeing my grandkids, stuff like that. I'm not saying I'm scared for my life. I'm saying that those are the things that I want to be here for. I want to make sure that I live a healthy life so I can be around for all of that.

You say that you work like you're going to lose everything at any given moment. Do you also love that way?

Of course. I try to give love to everybody that's next to me in the best way I know how. I try to share my life with them in a way that makes them feel like they have everything. That’s just how I operate. I focus on giving love and I focus on ensuring that [whoever is in my life] can walk away knowing that Nicky is a good guy. That I loved them and respected them. I'm the type of guy, I know when I go with God and I'm no longer on this earth, people gonna say, “I miss Nicky.” And that's when you know you made your legacy. When you make people miss you, you make people want to be with you. You make people want to say good things about you. That’s a legacy.

What’s your love language? How do you express your love to someone you care about?

I think the way I show love is by doing whatever it is I need to for my girl or for anybody that I love. You know what I'm saying? “What do you need?” I don't act like I'm this kind of guy, or that I can't do certain things. I don't have any limits when it's about showing love. It’s in the details, the stupid stuff. You want something? I’ll go get it for you. You want coffee? You hungry? You want me to get you anything? I got you.

You like to serve.

I definitely serve. I’m a server. It’s funny ‘cause I know I might not look like it, but that's who I am. That's how I show my love. And I think it's a good way to show it, ‘cause you know it when it’s gone.

And you brought your partner with you. How did you meet her?

I was doing a video called “Atrevete.” I called her agency and I thought she was the perfect girl for the video. It was just love at first sight. [Laughs] I just saw her come in the restaurant and I said, “Wow, that's a beautiful girl right there.” Then we started talking and it was just instant.

Really?

I had never seen eyes like that before. I just went crazy. Yeah, there's a lot of blue eyes, but something about her eyes drove me crazy. We were flirting around and everybody started to watch, and we just didn't care that people were there. We were just at it and it didn’t matter who was in the room. The video was about us. About me trying to win her over, and it worked. [Laughs]

Do you see a life with her?

Yeah. You also have to understand my background, where I come from and how I lost so many people in life. So my mind doesn’t necessarily… I try not to really think about it like that. I just try my best to enjoy [the present].

 

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My goofball ❤️

A post shared by Cydney Moreau (@cydrrose) on Jan 31, 2020 at 1:11pm PST

Is that what your “Life” tattoo is about?

It’s the only thing that matters, life and living it to your fullest. The word is a beautiful word. I don't think there's a more beautiful word. Other than God, maybe.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Photographer: Jason Chandler, Finalis Valdez

Art Designer: Nicole Tereza

Videographers: Dexterity Productions

Wardrobe Stylists: Norma Castro

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Premiere: ReeMarkable Turns The Lights Down Low With Sy Ari Da Kid For "VIBE"

Rapper Henree Wright, also known as ReeMarkable, is slowing things down on the sweetest of days with her new single, "VIBE."

With songwriter Sy Ari Da Kid (Future, Waka Flocka Flame) on the track, the two toy with an idea of a relationship after years apart. In addition to the love that lies beneath the games, the song also serves as a great addition to any playlist dedicated to Mary Jane. Produced by Atlanta's 8 Major, ReeMarkable takes a detour from the gritty raps heard on tracks like "Pardon Me" and "Bonnie And Clyde" and into more experimental sounds.

ReeMarkable's journey in music has been documented through her time on the series Growing Up Hip-Hop as the daughter of the late iconic rapper, Eazy-E. As his youngest child, the rapper-singer opened up about her struggles breaking into the industry and how she plans to honor her father through her music.

Recently, ReeMarkable paid homage to her father by recreating his most iconic images. Originally taken by legendary photographer Ricky Powell, ReeMarkable's take is commendable as she barely a striking resemblance to Eazy.

 

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I was a baby when you left this world , I have no memories, but I also don’t have any pain from your return to heaven. I am honored to be your daughter . I am the Spitting image of you and it warms me to see a legend every-time I look in the mirror. Today is a day for celebration as you would have came upon your 54th birthday . So here’s my gift to you . A shoot dedicated to simply, you . I directed this shoot and worked with a great team to capture your spirit daddy . I Love you & Happy Birthday , I hope you all enjoy . Captured by @lsfotography1 Graphics by @colourfulmula Make up by @tunchyy.marie Styled & directed by @iamreemarkable Special thanks to @vinceamani @exclusivegame , @bfflyer , @lakayb_ @thelazyhustler & All my Family Friends and Fans !! 🧡 #ripeazye EVERYONE SAY HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR ME 🎈🎁

A post shared by ReeMarkable (@iamreemarkable) on Sep 7, 2018 at 7:14am PDT

Enjoy "VIBE" below.

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LaQuan Smith On How A Confident Nature Bloomed His Fall/Winter Collection

New York's Spring Studios may have been dripped in white backdrops during NYFW, but the flavor was anything but bland during LaQuan Smith's Fall/Winter 2020 show. Presented alongside the launch of the new Moët & Chandon Limited-Edition Signature bottlings, the edgy but benevolent designer presented all-black looks that would make any fast fashion soldier switch over to the luxurious side.

Puffer jackets with skirts to match arrived down the runaway with baggy tracksuits, giving the audience an array of looks for the cozy girl all the way down to the trendy posh woman. Speaking with VIBE backstage, Smith shared how the importance of confident women inspired his recent unveiling. "I just wanted to do something that was super confident and really progressive," he explained. "I think that I have a really true sense of who my woman is at this point so right now I'm really having fun being able to design for a woman who is super comfortable in her own skin. This strong sense of elegance, glamour, and confidence is like the woman that I'm designing for so that was sort of the mood and the attitude for this season's collection."

The conscious mix of a free spirit and earnest attitude is something Smith has conjured since his early days on the scene. After making his NYFW debut in 2010, Smith has attracted the biggest names in entertainment on the runway like Rihanna, Cassie, Serena Williams, Nicki Minaj and recently supermodel Winnie Harlow. With such dominating and powerful women in Smith's orbit, it makes it easy to see just how spot-on his looks are.

But famous ladies aren't Smith's only muses. His show consisted of women of color—specifically Sudanese and Asian models, which made a big splash on social media. There was also a plus-size model who rocked the hell out of a little black dress.

"I'm inspired by a woman who appreciates getting dressed up in the day," Smith added. "Not even having a reason to dress up, just 'Yes!' Just 2 o'clock in the afternoon. I'm really about somebody who just enjoys the thrill of dressing up." But Smith's goal at the end of the day is to bring back chic demeanor of yesterday, where fashionistas would dress to the nines on Casual Fridays.

"I want to revive those moments again where women would wear skirt suits during the day to go to work," he said while pointing to his boiled wool jackets and matching pencil skirts. "They can transition from day to evening. I want to be able to bring back that level of glamour from an American perspective because I'm from New York City and this is the city that made me, this is the city that inspired me so for me to just be able to design and create off of all of my inspirations and my upbringing is a thrill."

Tina Turner's "What's Love Got To Do With It" closed the show but the celebratory vibes continued with guests like Tinashe, Delilah Hamlin, Amelia Hamlin, ASAP Ferg and Renell Medrano, Ryan Jamaal Swain, Young Paris, Patrick Starr, and Cyn Santana enjoying Moët & Chandon.

See more moments from the show below.

Tinashe  A$AP Ferg and Renell Medrano Ryan Jamaal Swain Jonathan Mannion Patrick Starr
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