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Facebook/Kalan Haywood

History Maker: At 19, Kalan Haywood Will Be The Youngest State Legislator In Wisconsin

This young politician is making history in Wisconsin's State Assembly.

At 19 years old, many young Americans are simply trying to navigate their way through the beginning years of college, with deadlines for papers as their main concern. However, Kalan Haywood Jr.'s life is a little different. The Wisconsin native is making history within the political arena.

By January 2019, when he's likely to formally be sworn in, Haywood will become the youngest state legislator in Wisconsin. He won the election back in August, beating out five other Democrats (there were no Republican opponents), and going forward, will represent Milwaukee's 16th District.

According to an interview with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Haywood feels that his young age is actually his biggest asset, regardless of any doubt that may arise. "Being young is going to play well with some people, but there will also be people who doubt me because of my age, which is fair — it’s new," he said.

This win is just the tip of the iceberg. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, it's likely that Haywood, who served on the Milwaukee Youth Council at 14, will be the youngest lawmaker in the United States, which is quite major. His topics of interest within this role include voting rights and how the people within his city are living. "Adding the requirement of registering to vote is very important," Hayward said, "especially in my district where we get a very low [voter] turnout compared to a total population."

While he's keeping tabs on local policies, Haywood will also be splitting his time between the new position and school. Currently, he is a second-year business student at Cardinal Stritch University.

READ MORE: U.S. Women Are Advancing In Politics At A Pleasantly Alarming Rate

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Hagen Hopkins

New Zealand Has Banned The Sale Of Semi-Automatic Guns And Riffles

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Wednesday (March 20) the nation would no longer sell semi-automatic guns and riffles. The sweeping legislation went into effect one week after an Australian man opened fire and killed 50 Muslim men, women and children.

"Today I am announcing that New Zealand will ban all military-style semi-automatic weapons. We will also ban all assault rifles," Ardern said at a press conference.

Prime Minister Arden said the new law would take effect Wednesday (March 20) at 3 PM local time and said dealers "should now cease" selling the guns.

"We will ban all high-capacity magazines. We will ban all parts with the ability to convert semi-automatic or any other type of firearm into a military-style semi-automatic weapon. We will ban parts that cause a firearm to generate semi-automatic, automatic or close to automatic gunfire," she continued.

The prime suspect in the attack reportedly obtained a gun license in 2017 and began purchasing more guns in the most following.

"This is just the beginning of the work we need to do," Ardern said.

The prime minister also noted that there are many in New Zealand who obtained their weapons legally and haven't used them for violence. She said a buyback program will be implemented at local police stations ensuring gun owners receive proper compensation for their weapon. Penalties will be put in place for those who don't participate.

The program may cost between $100 million and $200 million, but Prime Minister Arden says it's necessary "to ensure the safety of our communities."

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Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM

Donna Brazile Signs On As Fox News Contributor

On Monday afternoon (March 18), Donna Brazile inked a new contract to become a contributor for Fox News. According to Politico, the former Democratic National Committee (DNC) chairperson will provide statements on the nation's politics on Fox Business as well as the flagship cable station Fox News.

"In order for us to best decide as a people how to better protect and preserve our way of life, we need to first be able to hear what others are saying without the filter of bias and contempt," Brazile wrote in an op-ed about her decision. "Not until we once again become practiced at treating those of differing views with civility and respect can we begin to join together to solve the myriad of problems our country must overcome."

Brazile also mentions how important the upcoming 2020 presidential election is for the country, and that through her new platform, listening to the other side might disperse necessary information.

"In order for us to best decide as a people how to better protect and preserve our way of life, we need to first be able to hear what others are saying without the filter of bias and contempt," Brazile continued. "Not until we once again become practiced at treating those of differing views with civility and respect can we being to join together to solve the myriad of problems our country must overcome."

In 2016, Brazile resigned from her on-screen position at CNN on reports of collusion during Hilary Clinton's previous presidential campaign. Brazile was accused of sharing information with Clinton's team ahead of a town hall. In an attempt to get ahead of the criticism Brazile believes will come her way, she reiterated the need to have an open mind.

"There’s an audience on Fox News that doesn’t hear enough from Democrats," she said. "We have to engage that audience and show Americans of every stripe what we stand for rather than retreat into our ‘safe spaces’ where we simply agree with each other.”

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Mike Wintroath

Arkansas Rep. Flowers Goes Viral During Passionate Stand Your Ground Debate

A black Arkansas lawmaker has gone viral for her passionate remarks to her white colleagues during a Stand Your Ground debate.

The law was thrust onto the national stage in 2012 after then 27-year-old George Zimmerman shot and killed unarmed Trayvon Martin in one of the nation's most divisive racial profiling cases. Zimmerman was later acquitted of the crime.

During a debate about Senate Bill 484, which aimed to end the "duty to retreat" within the state. Rep. Stephanie Flowers (D) is seen raising her voice as she demands more time from other state judiciary committee members to discuss the measure.

"My son doesn't walk the same path as yours do, so this debate deserves more time," Flowers said Wednesday (March 6). "When you bring crap like this up, it offends me," she said Wednesday.

Reportedly, Flowers is the only black person on the eight-member committee. When Sen. Alan Clark (R) a white male committee member attempted to silence her, Flowers refused.

"Senator, you need to stop,” Clark said.

"No, I don’t!” Flowers responded.

“Yes, you do,” Clark said.

"No, the hell I don't. What are you going to do, shoot me?" Flowers responded.

According to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Flowers left the chambers soon after the exchange to smoke a cigarette. When she returned Clark said no action would be taken against her. A video of the debate made its way online via Now This and quickly amassed more than 362,000 views.

State Sen. Stephanie Flowers had a powerful and emotional response to a white lawmaker trying to silence her in a debate on Arkansas' ‘stand your ground’ gun laws pic.twitter.com/aZ1OQg2mOs

— NowThis (@nowthisnews) March 8, 2019

The GOP controlled committee reportedly voted 4-3 against the bill.

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