2015 MTV Video Music Awards - Backstage
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Nicki Minaj Shares Details On Song With Kanye West

The 'Queen' rapper said there's humor within her collaboration with West, which focuses on body-shaming.

In the midst of Nicki Minaj's rift with Cardi B, the former managed to give her fans an update on forthcoming music. During her Queen Radio show, Minaj dished on her collaborative song with Kanye West that'll center on body-shaming.

As noted by HotNewHipHop, the "Dip" rapper said the song tackles the body-shaming topic in "a very different, interesting, Kanye West way," so fans will have to wait and hear what's in store when the melody reportedly drops on Nov. 23. The untitled track might be featured on West's upcoming Yandhi album.

The pair has been featured on each other's songs dating back to Minaj's 2010 track "Blazin" and West's "Monster" of that same year. In October 2017, Minaj said she had a lengthy talk with West to make him keep "Monster" on his My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy album.

"It was like an hour long call where I tried to convince him to let the song stay on his album," she wrote. "He felt this verse would end up being the talk of the album. I said: YOU’RE KANYE WEST!!!!"

 

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7 year anniversary of #Monster Kanye called me to tell me Jay put a verse on this song & that he was still deciding if he would put it on his album. Haha. It was like an hour long call where I tried to convince him to let the song stay on his album. He felt this verse would end up being the talk of the album. I said: YOU’RE KANYE WEST!!!! 💞 I became the first female rapper to perform @ Yankee Stadium on the JAY/Eminem stadium tour. When I saw him, Jay said: “when u got so nice”? I said: “I been nice”! Ha! Kanye, thank you for being the genius you are. You always put others first. I fought u every step of the way but it worked out. (He wanted me to add more of that growling monster voice and I felt it was over kill.) He wouldn’t give in. In the end, maybe he was right. Ha! - this song featured Barbie and Roman. Chyna was my stunt double in the video. (Due to her ASSets). Amber had spoken highly of me to Ye n pushed for him to meet with me. The rest is history. Ye, Jay, Em...All 3 of them helped me in some way. Love

A post shared by Barbie® (@nickiminaj) on

In addition to her upcoming collabo with West, Minaj also shared that she has a song on the Creed II soundtrack. "There's someone on that song that I have never worked with," she said, "and someone on the song that I have worked with."

READ MORE: Nicki Minaj Influenced A Lyric On Kanye West’s ‘Ye’ Album

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Like Mother, Like Daughter: Blue Ivy Danced To 'Before I Let Go' At Her Dance Recital

Every so often, we get glimpses into the life of Blue Ivy Carter. The first-born child of Beyoncé and JAY-Z has proven to be a natural-born performer. Over the weekend, the seven-year-old performed in a recital for her dance school- the Debbie Allen Dance Academy.

While it’s still way too early to determine what Blue will do for a living, if all else fails, she could definitely follow in her mother’s footsteps.

A video emerged of one of the routines Blue performed in the recital, which was to her mother’s rendition of the song “Before I Let Go.” Ms. Carter was in the front for the routine, and showed off some pretty impressive moves, including the Electric Slide, the “floss” and a split.

“Blue ivy dancing to the song she choreographed*,” wrote one Twitter user, while another wrote “Nice of Blue Ivy to invent dancing.”

Fans of Blue Ivy were dubbed “The Ivy League,” and ever since footage of the little girl hitting some moves with ease emerged, they haven’t shown signs of slowing down.

Check out Blue’s routines below.

Blue Ivy dancing to Beyoncé's song “Before I Let Go” 🔥💕 pic.twitter.com/bj63d4RpfX

— Blue Ivy Source (@blueivysource) June 16, 2019

Blue Ivy dancing to “The Pink Panther” during the annual Spring Concert at the Debbie Allen Dance Academy 💕 pic.twitter.com/R8h084nEaj

— Blue Ivy Source (@blueivysource) June 16, 2019

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CNN Sparks Backlash For Article On White Woman Named LaKeisha

Over the weekend, CNN ignited a debate after they highlighted the story of a woman from a small town in western Ohio with an “ethnic-sounding” name.

LaKeisha Francis is a blonde-haired, blue-eyed bartender who did not know that her name was “stereotypically black,” as her parents believed it was just a beautiful name that they wanted their daughter to have. However, as she grew older, she realized that her “ethnic-sounding name” was making life difficult.

“I was joking with my co-worker one day and said, 'I'm just going to tell them my name is Emily so I can avoid all of this,''' Francis says of the comments she receives in response to her name, which range from snickering to disbelief from others due to her appearance.

“So if black-sounding names are looked at with such suspicion, why do some black people persist in using them?” one of the questions raised in the article read. “And where did the practice start in the first place?”

Later in the article, CNN reveals that LaKeisha is married with two kids who bear non-traditional names as well, and that she has “learned to live with being black for a minute.”

“A name doesn't make a non-Black person 'Black for a minute,' that's a trash take,” wrote one Twitter user in response to the article. Another wrote “I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha.”

Where do you stand on the topic? Let us know in the comments, and check out a few opinions below.

Read it twice just to make sure I didn't miss anything the first time. And sure enough it was worse the second time around. A name doesn't make a non-Black person "Black for a minute," that's a trash take. S/n: Jamal while a somewhat common name in the Black community is Arabic. pic.twitter.com/O6HXYeM66M

— IAmDamion🎤 (@themorganrpt) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

I don’t know what you were trying to accomplish with this when black folk faced with ethnic names faced more consequences than a white chick name lakiesha. I’m sure with her complexion she still got the American protection!

— H Boog (@HankDon_1) June 16, 2019

She can change her name. But we can’t change the color of our skin or the hate they have for us.

— Sh (@shersweety) June 16, 2019

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Ava DuVernay Joins THR's Roundtable To Talk 'When They See Us' Success

It took Ava DuVernay four years to write, research, cast and film Netflix's four-part series When They See Us; the story of how five black and brown boys from New York City were falsely accused and convicted of raping a 28-year-old white female jogger in Central Park.

The teens--Kevin Richardson, Antron McCray, Raymond Santana, Yusef Salaam, and Korey Wise--were no older than 16 in 1989 when real-estate developer Donald Trump, took out full-page ads in four city papers calling for their deaths.

Thirty years later, the men known by the nation as the Central Park 5, are having their say in what Netflix confirms to be the most-watched television series in the United States since its May 31 premiere date.

Continuing promotion, DuVernay joined actor turned director Ben Stiller, (Escape at Dannemora), Patty Jenkins, (Wonder Woman) Jean-Marc Vallée, (Sharp Objects) and Adam McKay (Succession) to discuss how she chooses which TV or film projects to tackle.

"This is really a tough job," DuVernay, 46, said. "I just gotta like it for myself. I'm tethered to these things for years, you know?"

The Academy-Award nominated director said her films are more than just pieces of art. They're an extension of what will stand long after she's gone.

"I also don't have children. These projects are also my children. My name's on this. That matters to me. This is what lives on when I'm done."

DuVernay admitted for a while she didn't want to be branded as the "social justice girl" in Hollywood but came to later accept it.  "I get every slavery script. All of them, history script, every first black firefighter in Delaware," DuVernay quipped. Like, that's a story that deserves to be told. I mean, really?"

Watch DuVernay talk about how she coaches her actors through traumatic roles.

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