Georgia Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Stacey Abrams Holds Primary Night Event In Atlanta
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Stacey Abrams To Sue Georgia For “Gross Mismanagement” Of State Elections

Abrams officially ended her bid to become governor. 

Stacey Abrams has ended her bid to become governor of the state of Georgia, but she’s not slowing down. During a speech from her Georgia headquarters Friday (Nov. 16), Abrams thanked supporters and announced plans to file a federal lawsuit against Georgia for “gross mismanagement” of state elections.

Abrams made it clear that she wasn't conceding the race to opponent Brian Kemp. "Concession means to acknowledge an action is right, true or proper," she explained. "As a woman of conscience and faith, I cannot concede that. But, my assessment is the law currently allows no further viable remedy.

"Now, I can certainly bring a new case to keep this one contest alive, but I don't want to hold public office if I need to scheme my way into the post," Abrams continued. "Because the title of governor isn't nearly as important as our shared title -- voters. And that is why we fight on and why I want to say thank you to those of you who organized your community and shattered records."

In a series of tweets Friday, Abrams reiterated her plan to take legal action.“Today, I announce the launch of Fair Fight Georgia, an operation that will pursue accountability in Georgia’s elections and integrity in the process of maintaining our voting rolls,” Abrams revealed. “In the coming days, we will be filing a major federal lawsuit against the state of Georgia for the gross mismanagement of this election and to protect future elections from unconstitutional actions.”

The statement aligns with the Democrat’s campaign against her Republican opponent, whom she called out for voter suppression tactics against disenfranchised communities.

Kemp was Georgia’s sectary of state at the time of the campaign, and was in charge of overseeing the same election that he ran in against Abrams.  The 55-year-old politician resigned from the position one day after declaring himself the “clear and convincing” winner in the November 6 midterms.

The governor's race triggered a recount of previously rejected absentee ballots, which a Georgia state judge ruled had to be counted before the winner could be determined. Since Abrams ended her campaign, Kemp is the automatic victor.

Read Abrams’ tweets below.

READ MORE: Oprah On Campaigning For Stacey Abrams: “I’ve Earned The Right To Do Exactly What I Want To Do”

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Ugandan Man Becomes A Lawyer To Win Back Father's Land

When Jordyn Kinyera was 6 years old, his father lost his land after being sued by neighbors. At the time, his father was retired and didn't have many resources to fight the case.

For two decades, the case dragged on in court. However, on Monday (April 1) a Ugandan court delivered a final judgment in favor of Kinyera's father, thanks to Kinyera himself.

Speaking to the BBC Kinyera said seeing his father's legal woes inspired him to become a lawyer.

"I made the decision to become a lawyer later in life but much of it was inspired by events I grew up witnessing, the circumstances and frustrations my family went through during the trial and how it affected us," Kinyera said.

It took Kinyera 18 years to receive the education needed to become a lawyer. Yet despite how long it took for him to legally win the land back, he's happy.

"Justice delayed is justice denied. My father is 82 years and he can't do much with the land now. It's up to us children to pick up from where he left."

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Lori Lightfoot Becomes Chicago’s First Black Female Mayor

Lori Lightfoot scored a historic win in Chicago's mayoral race. The 56-year-old former federal prosecutor became the Windy City’s first black female mayor Tuesday (April 2), as well as the city’s first lesbian major.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Lightfoot, pulled into the lead grabbing 74% of the vote against her opponent Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle.

“Thank you, Chicago. From the bottom of my heart, thank you,” Lightfoot said in her acceptance speech. “Today, you did more than make history. You created a movement for change.”

Thank you, Chicago! pic.twitter.com/IimreRoBff

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“When we started this journey 11 months ago, nobody gave us much of a chance,” she continued. “We were up against powerful interests, a powerful machine, and a powerful Mayor. But I remembered something Martin Luther King said when I was very young. Faith, he said, is taking the first step even when you can’t see the whole staircase.

“We couldn’t see the whole staircase when we started this journey, but we had faith—an abiding faith in this city, in its people, and in its future.”

Lightfoot also vowed to break the city's “endless cycle of corruption,” and work to make Chicago “thriving, prosperous, better, stronger, fairer -- for everyone.”

Preckwinkle, a  72-year-old former teacher, leader of the city's Democratic Party and former City Council Member, congratulated Lightfoot on her victory and thanked supporters.  “It has been amazing meeting supporters from across the city, hearing your stories and sharing our vision for the future of Chicago,” she tweeted.

Chicago, which is the nation’s third-largest city, elected Harold Washington as its first black mayor in 1983. Lightfoot is now only the third black mayor to be elected in the city, and the second female mayor.

Lightfoot will be sworn in on May 20. Read her speech below.

“Thank you, Chicago. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. Today, you did more than make history. You created a movement for change.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“When we started this journey 11 months ago, nobody gave us much of a chance. We were up against powerful interests, a powerful machine, and a powerful Mayor.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

 

“But I remembered something Martin Luther King said when I was very young. Faith, he said, is taking the first step even when you can’t see the whole staircase.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We couldn’t see the whole staircase when we started this journey, but we had faith—an abiding faith in this city, in its people, and in its future.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We still have faith, we still are determined, and with this mandate for change, now we’re going to take the next steps together.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“Together we can and will finally put the interests of our people—all of our people—ahead of the interests of a powerful few. Together we can and will make Chicago a place where your zipcode doesn’t determine your destiny.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We can and we will give our neighborhoods—all of our neighborhoods—the same time and attention that we give to the downtown. We can and will make sure our neighborhoods and our neighbors—all of our neighbors—are invested in each other.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“We can and we will break this city’s endless cycle of corruption, and never again allow politicians to profit from their elected positions.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

“Together we can and will remake Chicago. Thriving, prosperous, better, stronger, fairer—for everyone.”

— Lori Lightfoot (@LightfootForChi) April 3, 2019

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The Supreme Court Rules A Painless Execution Is Not Guaranteed By The Constitution

The Supreme Court ruled Monday (April 1) that a painless execution was not guaranteed under the United States Constitution, which means Missouri death row inmate Russell Bucklew's potential suffocation due to a severe condition as a result of the lethal injection, is legal.

According to the Los Angeles Times a 5-4 vote rejected Bucklew's claim that to receive the lethal injection would be a form of cruel and unusual punishment, and that the state would have to find another way to execute him.

The case split the judges down the middle.

The court's conservatives said that after 18 years on death row, Bucklew's allegation was a last ditch hail marry to halt the execution for more years. Bucklew reportedly waited a little less than two weeks before his execution to file a suit.

“The people of Missouri, the surviving victims of Mr. Bucklew’s crimes and others like them deserve better,” Justice Neil M. Gorsuch wrote in Bucklew vs. Precythe. “Under our Constitution, the question of capital punishment belongs to the people and their representatives, not the courts, to resolve.”

However, Justice Sonia Sotomayor challenged that a painful execution may set a dangerous precedent.

“There are higher values than ensuring executions run on time,” she wrote in one of two dissents filed by liberals. “If a death sentence or the manner in which it is carried out violates the Constitution, that stain can never come out.”

In 1996, after Bucklew's girlfriend tried to end their relationship he went on a violent rampage. When she escaped to a neighbor's house he shot and killed the neighbor and then beat the woman with a gun and raped her. Reportedly, after a shootout with the police, he escaped from jail and only to beat his girlfriend's mother with a hammer.

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