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2018 In Hip-Hop: A Year Of Quantity Over Quality

It seemed like labels and rappers were dumping hard drives worth of material into the market, inundating listeners with a supply that outpaced demand.

No matter who ranks in your Top 10 living hip-hop faves, they almost certainly released music this year. From young stunners and new jacks to career spitters and grizzled vets, rap poured down in proverbial buckets, dousing listeners Friday after Friday, with not infrequent ghost showers during select weekdays and weekends, too. Whether you vibe with the lyrical miracles or rage along with the screamers, your Spotify account got one hell of a workout in 2018.

Many rap listeners interpreted all this as an embarrassment of riches, the irrefutable evidence of hip-hop as the prevailing genre of the digital age. Stans collectively reveled in the new album smell of their chosen faves like J. Cole and Nicki Minaj, while emergent contenders including Cardi B and Brockhampton amassed major fan bases around the very existence of their full-length projects. Indicative of this recorded overabundance, LPs from consensus G.O.A.T.s shared release dates with fresh mixtapes by popular upstarts and emerging SoundCloud kids, as was the case when Lil Wayne’s long-awaited Tha Carter V arrived in the same frame as Logic’s Young Sinatra IV and Lil Gnar’s Gnar Lif3. Bruised by a critically panned comeback record late last year, Eminem applied shock tactics by releasing Kamikaze without warning, stunning the dueling chart toppers of Drake’s double-album Scorpion and Travis Scott’s Astroworld.

Collaborations, particularly high profile ones, proved more common and competitive than ever, with the Kanye West-helmed Nas project Nasir arriving the very same weekend as Everything Is Love, a surprise album from erstwhile rival Jay-Z co-headlined by Beyoncé herself. Buzzworthy trap climbers Lil Baby and Gunna tag teamed their way into the Billboard 200’s upper rung, making them essential guests on what seems like dozens of subsequent singles, albums, and mixtapes for the remainder of the year. One week brought the intergenerational codeine swap meet of Future and Juice WRLD while another partnered up cloud rap survivor Curren$y with Midwest lyricist Freddie Gibbs. Producer showcases exploded the phenomenon altogether, with Metro Boomin’s Not All Heroes Wear Capes obsessively collecting Hot 100 hit-making rappers like coveted Pokemon critters. Hell, even The Diplomats got back together.

Further magnifying matters, some record labels made sport out of being prolific. G.O.O.D. Music kicked off a much ballyhooed six week experiment of successive mini-albums with imprint president Pusha T’s DAYTONA and wrapped with Teyana Taylor’s buzzworthy dark horse K.T.S.E. With less fanfare and, admittedly, a more reliable schedule, Quality Control Music has kept the autumn on lock with new full-lengths and EPs from its stable of talents including Lil Baby and Lil Yachty along with solo sets from two of the three Migos.

Event albums begat event albums begat even more event albums. That blockbuster spirit inevitably manifested as actual movie soundtracks, often with key rappers as executive producers. Mere months before winning the Pulitzer Prize for Music for last year’s DAMN., Kendrick Lamar turned the Black Panther soundtrack into a glorified Top Dawg Entertainment compilation. Coupled with the fanfare around the Afrocentric comic book film, it shot to the top of the Billboard 200. Coinciding with an altogether unwanted reboot of the 1970s cult exploitation flick, Future’s Superfly featured a dozen of his songs, comprising about half of the record’s total run time. Less effective in the category were soundtracks for the Rocky Balboa Cinematic Universe’s Creed 2, helmed by Mike Will Made It, and the Pepsi Max brand extension vehicle Uncle Drew, which included good enough tracks by A$AP Ferg, G-Eazy, and Wiz Khalifa.

At times, things got kinda weird, as should be expected when dealing with such creative profusion. Snoop Dogg compiled a whole gospel album, with appearances by notable vocalists Kim Burrell and Marvin Sapp alongside ones from his usual suspects Daz Dillinger and Uncle Charlie Wilson. Channeling his inner Clarence Carter, the Baton Rouge native Boosie Badazz dropped an hour’s worth of relatively conventional blues tunes, a decidedly hard left turn away from his typical trill fare. Zaytoven brought out pop icon Usher for an eight-song tribute to Atlanta, Lupe Fiasco concocted a movie-length audio fantasia about African slaves who survived sinkings by adapting to undersea life, and Tyga outed himself as a possible furry with the cover art to his pre-comeback flop Kyoto. Even Golden Age godhead Slick Rick slid into Mariah Carey’s (!!!) mentions with a low-key verse for her Caution highlight “Giving Me Life.”

While there’s no disputing that 2018 delivered in terms of quantity, quality was much harder to come by. More often than not, it seemed like labels and rappers were dumping hard drives worth of material onto the market, inundating listeners with a supply that obviously outpaced demand and our capacity to receive. In addition to the Superfly soundtrack and his WRLD On Drugs collab, Future dropped the Zaytoven-produced Beastmode 2, another eleven songs for DJ Esco’s Kolorblind, and features for everyone from Freebandz affiliates Doe Boy and Young Scooter to major label pals DJ Khaled and Rick Ross. Migos and Rae Sremmurd needlessly crossed the hundred minute mark with their sequels Culture II and SR3MM, each overstuffed with the unsubtle intent to game the weight given to digital consumption in both Billboard and the RIAA’s respective unit sales methodologies. The same went for Drake’s Scorpion, the latest blatant attempt by the streaming scofflaw to make every full play of his album count as 2.5 plays.

Say what you will about any of these aforementioned albums right now, but when it comes time to rank them in your iTunes record collection few if any will rise above as catalog contenders. Everything Is Love obviously brought excitement in that first weekend, but it assuredly won’t supplant The Blueprint, Reasonable Doubt, or The Black Album the next time some blue-checked Twitterer poses the question. Despite The Carters’ status in music, the ephemeral thrills of their record undeniably evaporated barely two weeks later when Scorpion arrived to crowd the conversation. Barely a month later, Astroworld finally hit. A week passed then Minaj’s ˆ came, followed a couple weeks later by Kamikaze.

The relentlessness of such a schedule, which obviously included dozens more projects from hip-hop artists with comparatively less fame, leaves scarcely any time to even attempt to fully appreciate these records. Apart from the most fixated of stans, who treat their factional fandoms with all the gravitas of reality show melodrama, the majority of listeners hopped around and sampled the wares at the streaming platform of their choice, perhaps weighing in online with glib one-listen reviews to demonstrate that they’d paid at least a modicum of attention. While so many rappers ruled the Billboard charts week after week, much of that success proved short-lived, with steep second week declines making the road to RIAA gold and beyond all the longer. Though problematic faves like 6ix9ine and XXXTentacion fueled hits off their legal woes and controversies, most artists found themselves quickly crowded out by the next wave of releases seven days later.

A lot of lip service has been paid to the shortness of attention spans in the social media era. Yet even if we weren’t all consuming our information in short-form videos and pithy tweets, the day still only lasts 24 hours, and only a fraction of that time can reasonably go towards listening to music. That may have made manageable EPs and sitcom-sized outings by Vince Staples, Young Thug, and others all the more enticing, but again the overall volume and steadily heavy flow of new material soon negated those projects too.

With only two New Music Fridays left in the calendar year, the amount of remaining 2018 releases continue the taxing trend. Last week brought albums by Kodak Black, Method Man, and Vic Mensa, while this one promises records by 21 Savage and A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie. A hip-hop soundtrack for animated feature Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is also on the way. Last minute surprises drops can’t be ruled out either, though Kanye’s twice-delayed Yandhi appears more idle threat than promise at this point.

Amid all the glut, admittedly, were some beautiful and memorable works. Noname’s coming of age word jazz odyssey Room 25 earned righteous acclaim, and the untimely passing of Mac Miller added greater gravity to his Swimming album. Hopefully something that dropped over the last 12 months connected with you enough to have staying power in your listening life. But looking back, 2018 felt like some sort of capitalist con, a calculated group effort to keep us dependent on streaming platforms backed by corporate tech giants at home and abroad. Back in the day, when sales meant physical media purchases rather than shorthand calculations guesstimating the value of a song play online, the industry wouldn’t have dared to unload this much music all at once. Now, however, they’re incentivized to force feed, leaving rap music listeners perpetually stuffed but somehow never ever satisfied.

RELATED: Debate Us: The 30 Best Albums of 2018

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Issa Vibe: The Best Songs To Fit Your Different 4/20 Sessions

April 20th isn’t a national holiday, but it might as well be.

Although recreational marijuana use is only legal in 10 states, the U.S. is home to approximately 35 million regular users of cannabis, according to a survey done by Yahoo News and Marist University. That's 10.6 percent of the American population and while that may seem minuscule, the numbers are growing daily and it's understandable.

Weed has now become a staple of American culture; it's become a legitimate business in the states where it's legal, it's now part of the way people socialize, and better yet it's a theme in some of the hottest music out today. "Kush" has been included in some of the hardest verses that millennials and generation-z kids have heard in their lifetime.

Wiz Khalifa and Snoop Dogg, amazing emcees in their own right, are also widely known for their love of the green plant. Wiz's biggest album, Rolling Papers is clearly influenced by weed and along with the Snoop Dogg-assisted "Young, Wild & Free" is all about that green positivity.

There's an endless list of hits about rolling up a joint, hitting it and passing it, but what about moods? Whether it's a bowl, a blunt or an edible weed, can leave people feeling a variety of ways and that all can be traced to a certain strand of weed someone's inhaling, or the mood they're already.

Regardless, it's important to be prepared and have music ready to match whatever feelings marijuana concocts; and that's why VIBE compiled an adequate list of songs for each of the main pot moods.

So on this 4/20, sit back, relax, smoke and find the songs that suit the vibe.

___

The "Let Me Chill Out" Mood 

Sometimes the best way to come down from an over the top high is to play some tunes with a soft beat and a light voice. The best artists in the game right now, like Jhené Aiko for instance, have created that sound that's perfect for when relaxation is needed, so of course, she made the list.  These are the top four songs that can help anyone kick back and relax if a pull from a joint just isn't hitting the right way.

"Blue Dream" by Jhené Aiko "Muse" by Afro Nostalgia "Summer Games" by Drake "LOVE." by Kendrick Lamar (feat. Zacari) The Bad B*tch Hours or "Top Two and I'm Not Two" Mood 

You look around the room and realize: you're top two and you're not two in it. All it took was one or a couple of puffs and then a pass to make you feel pretty good about yourself. One of the main upsides to smoking that's constantly mentioned in the media is that it can help alleviate chronic pain, well, another positive to it is that it can leave you feeling sexy, sensual and everything in between.

This is that high that can make you feel that you're significant other is lucky to have you, and subsequently makes you hit them up, that tells you: you're single and ready to mingle. It's a smoking session that lets you know: if you shoot your shot now, you'll score and it's a session that you want music playing that only affirms how sultry and seductive you feel. If this is how 4/20 leaves you feeling, putting on some RiRi or even Young Thug can effectively get you 'in your bag.'

"Same Ol' Mistakes" by Rihanna "Tyrant" by Kali Uchis (feat. Jorja Smith) "Worth It" by Young Thug "Smoke Break" by Chance the Rapper (feat. Future) The "Head in the Clouds" Mood 

More often than not, edibles have the power of leaving people spaced out and speaking slowly, after consuming them. Sometimes smoking weed, or hotboxing with friends is a silent event. Either everyone's consumed by their phones, or every other person has been looking at a nonexistent spot on the wall for the past 15 minutes.

Regardless this isn't the high where people want to hear "Act Up" by City Girls, no matter how much they love them. No, this is the high where people need music that takes them on a journey. Songs where the production is out of this world and it seems like the artist specifically made the song for a smoke session like no other. Travis Scott's ASTROWORLD is full of tracks with that vibe, and Lil' Wayne, a weed connoisseur of his own, has songs that fulfill that need too. Smoke a bit and let the weed do its thing.

"ASTROTHUNDER" by Travis Scott "I Feel Like Dying" by Lil' Wayne "Hyyer" by Kid Cudi "St. Tropez" by J. Cole The "Got the Giggles" Mood 

This is when the blunt hits perfectly and there's nothing wrong in the world or when the bowl did its' job and leaves everyone feeling silly. A "feel good high" is the best way to describe and the best way to live through that kind of smoke session is to listen to some "feel good music." These are the songs that can have people swaying unknowingly to its' beat, or the tracks that leave people smiling from ear to ear. This is the session that lets people know that "this is it chief," and here are the best songs to go along with it.

"Pass the Vibes" by Donnie Trumpet & The Social Experiment "Dreamcatcher" by Metro Boomin' (feat. Swae Lee & Travis Scott) "It's a Vibe" by 2 Chainz (feat. Ty Dolla $ign, Trey Songz & Jhené Aiko) "Binz" by Solange
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4/20: A VIBE-Era Timeline Of Hip-Hop's Relationship With Cigars And Rolling Papers

Hip-hop's relationship with Mary Jane has always been a beloved one. From song from artists like Styles P, Curren$y and Snoop Dogg, laying back and enjoying nature's herbs is a coveted pastime in the game.

But we wouldn't be able to enjoy it all without the inclusion of cigars and rolling papers. Sure, we have vapes and other creative ways to reach aerial heights, but the OG accessories bring a different element to the table. The herb holiday might be a perfect time for enthusiasts to light one in the air, but VIBE was inspired to pay homage to hip-hop's love for the preroll.

Only keeping the VIBE-era in mind (starting from 1992), we analyzed companies like Swisher Sweets, Phillies and more, along with its ambassadors throughout the game like Snoop Dogg, Cypress Hill and Wiz Khalifa.

Enjoy the brief timeline of Hip-Hop's relationship with cigars and rolling papers below.

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___ 1. Zig Zag

 

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A post shared by Zig-Zag World (@zigzagworld) on Apr 15, 2019 at 1:06pm PDT

Established Since 1855

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1992-1996 / 2009-2013

Most Popular in California

Top Ambassadors: Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa, Curren$y, Juicy J

In 1988, N.W.A. founder Eazy-E established Zig Zag as the official rolling paper for west-coasters after referencing the brand on a song from his solo debut, Eazy-Duz-It. In subsequent years, Zig Zag would appear on songs from legends like Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, 2Pac, and B-Real, resulting in the brand becoming synonymous with the west coast.

The decline in west coast rap's popularity during the latter half of the '90s would result in a decreased amount of nods to Zig Zag within hip-hop, as other brands continued to dominate the conversation. In 2009, Zig Zag's standing among rap fans would receive a jolt when Wiz Khalifa and Curren$y teamed up for their collaborative mixtape How Fly, which included numerous references to the brand. However, as other brands of rolling papers began to dominate the market, Zig Zag's approval rating faltered slightly, but continues to transcend generations and will forever be remembered as the O.G. smokers utensil.

2. E-Z Wider

Established Since 1972

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1992-1996 / 2008-2011

Most Popular in New York

Top Ambassadors: Wiz Khalifa, Chris Webby

The east coast's affinity for blunts is well-documented, but for a brief period during the '90s, EZ-Wider became the alternative for a select group of rappers out of New York City. Introduced into to hip-hop lexicon by A Tribe Called Quest member Phife Dawg on "Scenario (Demo 2)," EZ-Wider enjoyed a short run among smokers in the hip-hop community before losing its luster by the mid-'90s.

After more than a decade of sporadic mentions in rap songs, EZ-Wider made a comeback. This was largely on the strength of rappers like Wiz Khalifa, who brought the brand back to prominence in the late aughts during his transition from rolling cigars to smoking using paper. Over the past decade, EZ-Wider's popularity has been eclipsed by competing brands in the market, but its place within hip-hop history is secure.

3. Phillies Cigars (Known as Phillie Blunts)

 

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A post shared by Phillies Cigars & Tobacco Fans (@philliescigars) on Oct 7, 2018 at 1:19pm PDT

Established Since 1910

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1992-1999

Most Popular in New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Atlanta

Top Ambassadors: Nas, The Notorious B.I.G., Redman, Big Pun, Big Boi, N.O.R.E., Big L

The first cigar to truly reign supreme in hip-hop is the Phillie blunt with a history that runs deep. Referenced as early as 1989, the Phillie came to prominence during the early '90s, with rappers like Redman, Nas, and The Notorious B.I.G. becoming unofficial ambassadors of the brand.

Found in some of the most memorable rap songs of all-time, the Phillie blunt was the cigar of choice on the east coast but began to spread to regions like the south and midwest, with artists like Big Boi of Outkast, and Twista singing its praises. By the end of the '90s, the popularity of the Phillie blunt began to wane, and while it still receives the occasional mention for nostalgic purposes, has never regained its stature as the go-to cigar in hip-hop.

4. Swisher Sweets

Established Since 1959

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1993-Present

Most Popular in California, Texas, Tennessee, Illinois, Louisiana

Top Ambassadors: Three 6 Mafia, UGK, 8Ball & MJG, Scarface, Kid Ink, Lil Wayne, Freddie Gibbs, Gucci Mane, Wiz Khalifa, The Game, Lil Durk, Fat Trel, Ab-Soul, YG, Danny Brown, Fredo Santana, Machine Gun Kelly, Wale, Mac Miller, G-Eazy, G Herbo, Kevin Gates, Jeezy, 21 Savage

During the early '90s, Swisher Sweets emerged as the cigar brand of choice among marijuana enthusiasts in the south and western regions of the country. Since as early as 1993, when rap group Souls of Mischief helped put the brand on the map, Swisher Sweets cigars have become a staple in hip-hop, maintaining their popularity for the better part of a quarter century.

Over the years, Swisher Sweets has been name-dropped in songs by rappers from all corners of the country, but rap legends UGK and Three 6 Mafia were among the brand's most fervent supporters. Today, artists like Gucci Mane and Lil Yachty continue to keep Swisher Sweet in the public consciousness and recognized as one of the legacy smoking utensils in hip-hop culture

5. White Owl Cigarillos

 

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A post shared by Gotham Cigars (@gothamcigars) on Sep 9, 2014 at 8:29am PDT

Established Since 1887

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1993-1997

Most Popular in New York

Top Ambassadors: Wu-Tang Clan

One cigar that caught traction among marijuana aficionados during the early-mid '90s was the White Owl, which became one of the leading brands on the east coast at its peak. Initially popping up on the rap radar via a mention by Gang Starr member Guru in 1992, White Owl would be championed by a number of rap artists out of New York. One act that helped solidify White Owl's standing within hip-hop culture was the Wu-Tang Clan, as numerous members of the Staten Island-based collective paid homage to the brand until its sudden decrease in popularity during the latter half of the decade.

6. Optimo

 

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A post shared by | Cigars (@optimocigars) on Feb 24, 2019 at 5:02pm PST

Established Since 1898

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1997-2001

Most Popular in Texas, Louisiana, Tennessee

Top Ambassador: Juicy J

The Notorious B.I.G. may have immortalized the brand after referencing their cigars on his hit single "Big Poppa," but Optimo's lineage in hip-hop can be actually traced back to the southern region of the country. As rap acts out of the south began to reach a national audience during the latter half of the '90s, Optimo's approval rating skyrocketed as well, quickly becoming the cigar of choice for many of the region's star talent.

This particularly proved true in states like Texas, Louisiana, and Tennessee, where Optimo was considered king among blunt smokers and mentioned at a seemingly constant clip. Optimo cigars are not as prominent in rap lyrics as they once were, but remain a legacy brand in the south and have earned their rightful place in the annals of hip-hop history.

7. Garcia Y Vega

 

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GO GET #1882 BACKWOODS AT YOUR NEAREST SMOKE SHOP!!! #1882s

A post shared by Garcia Y Vega 1882 Cigars (@1882_backwoods) on Jun 22, 2015 at 10:57am PDT

Established Since 1882

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop):1995-2001

Most Popular in New York, California

Top Ambassador: JT tha Bigga Figga

One cigar brand that had a brief, but noteworthy run within hip-hop was Garcia Y Vega, which was touted by various rap artists on the east coast in beyond. Finding its way into a rap song as early as 1994, the popularity of the Garcia Y Vega cigar was largely relegated to the east coast during its peak years in the latter half of the '90s.

The brand's popularity reached all the way to California, where rappers like JT the Bigga Figga helped give Garcia Y Vega its cultural clout. Today, a Garcia Y Vega cigar is largely considered a relic, but its recognition within the hip-hop community as one of the defining brands for blunt-gut spillers is well-deserved.

8. Dutch Masters Cigars

 

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#DutchMastersCigars

A post shared by Russian Cream (@dutchmasterscigars) on Apr 15, 2019 at 5:31pm PDT

Established Since 1911

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1996-2008

Most Popular in New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia

Top Ambassadors: Wu-Tang Clan, Mobb Deep, The Lox

In terms of sheer dominance of the market, Dutch Masters was once at the top of the list of cigars among marijuana smokers. Introduced by members of the Wu-Tang Clan during the group's rise to power, Dutch Masters would quickly catch on with fellow New Yorkers, including like-minded rap acts Mobb Deep and The LOX.

By the time the smoke from the cigar wars of the '90s cleared, Dutch Masters was the clear victor, as the brand extended its dominance into the next decade. While Dutch Masters' stronghold on the lungs of rap artists and fans alike began to dissipate by the end of the aughts, the brand still receives nods til this day and remains the go-to cigar within the hip-hop community.

9. Backwoods Smokes

 

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Rate these 1-10 and why? #exoticbackwoods

A post shared by Backwoods Cigars (@backwoods_cigars) on Mar 26, 2019 at 3:41pm PDT

Established Since 1973

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 1998-2005, 2013-Present

Most Popular in New York, Philadelphia, California, Texas, Atlanta

Top Ambassadors: Beanie Sigel, Freeway, Mac Dre, Travis Scott, Lil Yachty,

One cigar that has transcended regions and managed to sustain its standing among marijuana smokers is the Backwood, which has a history that is as rich as any brand in hip-hop. Referenced in a rap lyric as far back as 1994, by the turn of the century, Backwoods saw a spike in popularity, with rappers from the east coast and west coasts singing its praises.

After finding equal footing with the competing cigar brands at the time, Backwoods' visibility within rap dipped during the latter half of the aughts, before returning to prominence the next decade. This was due in large part to the influx of a new generation of rap stars gravitating to the brand, resulting in it regaining its reputation as the unofficial cigar of hip-hop as of 2019 and moving forward.

10. RAW Rolling Papers

 

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A few cones a day.. : @ganjawitness #rawlife #natural #rollingpapers #alcoyspain #rawpapersovereverything

A post shared by RAW Rolling Papers (@rawlife247) on Feb 10, 2019 at 5:10pm PST

Established Since 2005

Peak Years of Popularity (In Hip Hop): 2012-Present

Most Popular in North America

Top Ambassadors: Wiz Khalifa, Curren$y, 2 Chainz, Mick Jenkins, Chris Webby, Z-Ro, Futuristic

As the new kid on the block, RAW Rolling Papers may lack the rich history of other brands in the market, however, its place as the current smoking utensil of choice in hip-hop cannot be denied.

Establishing itself right in time for the cultural gravitation to rolling papers during the late aughts, RAW Rolling Papers capitalized on early cosigns from marijuana mavens like Wiz Khalifa and Curren$y to infiltrate the culture. With about a decade since its first mention in a rap song, RAW Papers have become a cultural institution in their own right, partnering with various rap artists and connecting the dots between hip-hop, culture, and marijuana.

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Kush & Splendor: 5 CBD Beauty Products That’ll Take Your Self-Care Routine From 0 To 100

Lotions, creams, and salves—oh my! With cannabidiol (CBD) popping up in just about every product you can imagine, the cannabis-infused beauty industry is clearly on the come-up. In fact, analysts predict that the “wellness” movement—as well as the legalization of Mary Jane across the world—will help rake in $25 billion globally in the next 10 years, according to Business Insider. That’s 15 percent of the $167 billion skincare market.

And what better way to up the ante on one’s wellness routine than with all-natural CBD? Just ask Dr. Lana Butner, naturopathic doctor and acupuncturist at NYC’s Modrn Sanctuary, who incorporates CBD in her treatments.

“CBD is a fantastic addition to acupuncture sessions for both its relaxation and anti-inflammatory, pain-relieving effects,” Butner shares with Vixen. “The calming effects of CBD allows for patients to deeply relax into the treatment and really tap into the parasympathetic nervous system, which is responsible for rest, digestion and muscle repair/regeneration.”

She adds that CBD’s pain-relieving effects are “far-reaching,” from muscular and joint pains to migraines and arthritis—and even IBS and indigestion.

The magic lies in CBD’s ability to impact endocannabinoid receptor activity in our bodies. Without getting too wordy, our bodies come equipped with a system called the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is the HBIC over our sleep, appetite, pain and immune system response. Also known as cannabidiol, CBD teams up with this system to help reduce inflammation and interact with neurotransmitters. According to Healthline, CBD has also been scientifically shown to impact the brain’s receptors for serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for regulating our mood and social behavior.

All that said, it’s important to note that not all CBD products are created equal. Many brands cashing in on the green beauty wave use hemp seed oil, sometimes referred to as cannabis sativa seed oil, in place of CBD... which doesn’t make them any less great! Hemp seed oil is actually high in antioxidants, amino acids, and omega-3 and -6 fatty acids—all of which are thebomb.com for your skin.

“It’s generally viewed as a superfood and is great for adding nutritional value to your diet,” Ashley Lewis, co-founder of Fleur Marché, told Well and Good last month. “In terms of skin care, it’s known as a powerful moisturizer and skin softener that doesn’t clog pores or contribute to oily skin.”

However, when companies start marketing CBD and hemp oil as one-in-the-same, that’s when things get a bit tricky.

“The biggest issue is that hemp seed oil and CBD are two totally different compounds that come from different parts of the hemp plant, have different makeups, and different benefits,” Lewis added. “Marketing them as the same thing just isn’t accurate and does a disservice to consumers who are expecting certain benefits that they won’t get from hemp seed oil and who are often paying more for what they think is CBD.”

So if you’re looking to benefit from the perks specifically attributed to CBD, make sure you’re reading labels before buying, and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Hell, ask for a product’s test results, while you’re at it. It never hurts to be sure.

Now that we’ve got that out of the way, are you ready to see what all the hype is about? For this 4/20, we rounded up a few CBD (and hemp!)-infused products to help give your self-care routine a bit of a boost. Looks like your holiday just got that much kushier. You’re welcome!

Note: Data and regulations surrounding CBD and its use are still in development. That said, please don’t take anything written in this post as medical or legal advice, and definitely double check the laws in your state. Also, please do your body a favor and hit up your doctor before trying any new supplements. We’re just tryna look out for you. Okay? Okay. Read on.

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