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Senate To Propose Two Bills That Might End Government Shutdown

"It's like bargaining for stolen goods."

Since Dec. 22, more than a handful of federal workers have yet to clock in. Under Donald Trump's order, agencies that fall within the federal government's banner were closed until a resolve concerning immigration and a border wall between Mexico and the United States was agreed upon by Democrats and Republicans in the Senate.

While on the latter's end a proposal of $5.7 billion to fund the wall was met with contention by the Democrats, both parties plan to meet on Thursday (Jan. 24) to propose two bills that might speed up the end of the shutdown. According to TIME, the Republican's proposal still includes the multi-billion dollar request for the wall, but they would agree to give Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Temporary Protected Status (TPS) recipients a "three-year reprieve" from being deported. The Democrats want to re-open the government until Feb. 8 as a means of gathering more time to reach a resolution.

TIME also notes that the Democrats might not agree to the GOP's plan because, on the subject of DACA and TPS recipients, a formidable plan of action to protect them has yet to be implemented. "The President's proposal is one-sided, harshly partisan, and was made in bad faith. It's like bargaining for stolen goods," Senator Chuck Schumer said.

Per ABC News, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi stressed the dire position the country is in under Trump's position. "We can't have a president, every time he has an objection, to say I'll shut down government until you come to my way of thinking," Pelosi said. "Understand, that is part of the point of this. If we hold the employees hostage now, they're hostage forever."

The proposals both need 60 votes, which would possibly lead to ending the shutdown.

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Donald Trump Promises To Cure Cancer And AIDS In Re-Election Rally Speech

Donald Trump formally kicked off his re-election campaign Tuesday (June 18) with a rally in Orlando, Florida. Standing in front of a packed crowd of MAGA hat-wearing supporters, Trump promised attendees everything but the sun, moon and the stars.

At the Amway Center, Trump said he would cure cancer and vow his administration would work to eradicate HIV and AIDS if re-elected to a second term.

"We will push onward with new medical frontiers," Trump said. "We will come up with the cures to many, many problems, to many, many diseases including cancer and others. And we're getting closer all the time."

According to the American Cancer Society, in 2018 there were 1.7 million new cancer diagnoses in the United States and 609,640 perished.

During the president's State of The Union speech in January, Trump promised he'd get rid of H.I.V and AIDS by 2030. On Tuesday, he doubled-down on his previous statement. "We will eradicate AIDS in America once and for all — and we are really close."

The Center for Disease Control estimates 1.1 million people are living with H.I.V today.

During the rally, Trump reportedly was able to raise $24.8 million in 24 hours. The staggering amount overshadows how much several Democratic nominees have been able to crowd raise.

 

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Mitch McConnell Doesn't Support Reparations...And Water Is Wet

Reporters asked Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel (R-KY) about his stance on reparations as the topic has become a hot-button issue during the 2020 presidential news cycle. On Tuesday, (June 18) the 77-year-old said he doesn't think paying the descendants of slaves "is a good idea."

"I don't think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago for whom none us currently living are responsible is a good idea," McConnell responded. "We've tried to deal with our original sin of slavery by fighting a civil war, bypassing landmark civil rights legislation. We elected an African American president."

The timing of the question came a day before the House Judiciary Committee would have a hearing on the issue, reportedly, for the first time in a decade.

"I think we're always a work in progress in this country, but no one currently alive was responsible for that, and I don't think we should be trying to figure out how to compensate for it. First of all, it would be pretty hard to figure out who to compensate. ... No, I don't think reparations are a good idea," McConnell said.

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Between The World And Me author and activist Ta-Nehisi Coates attended the meeting and responded to McConnel's comments.

"We grant that Mr. McConnell was not alive for Appomattox," Coates said, speaking of the battle that ended the Civil War. "But he was alive for the electrocution of George Stinney. He was alive for the blinding of Isaac Woodard. He was alive to witness kleptocracy in his native Alabama in a regime premised on electoral theft."

Coates rose to literary stardom in 2014 when he laid bare the case for reparation in The Atlantic.

"McConnell cited civil rights legislation yesterday, as well he should because he was alive to witness the harassment, jailing, and betrayal of those responsible for that legislation. I am sure they'd love a word with the majority leader."

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Donald Trump's Re-Election Campaign Raises $24.8 Million

Donald Trump kicked off his re-election campaign Tuesday, (June 18) and within 24 hours raised a reported $24.8 million.

According to The Associated Press, the hefty sum was made public by way of a tweet from the Republican Party Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel. The nearly $25 million overshadows what the Democratic presidential primary candidates have raised in the past three months.

Trump's incumbency plays a large role in his ability to fundraise, however, at the end of March Trump revealed he had $48. 7 million in cash spread out between three committees connected to his campaign. The Republican National Committee also has an additional $34.7 million in election aid.

Tuesday evening, Trump held his formal re-election rally in Orlando, Florida to a packed crowd of supporters, many of whom who donned the red MAGA hat. According to CNN, the 76-minute speech was littered with inaccuracies including the U.S's standing on energy, the border wall, Russia and the environment.

"Our air and water are the cleanest they've ever been by far," Trump said. CNN reports the American Lung Association, America's air quality has gotten worse.  The Association's findings "that in 2015-2017, more cities had high days of ozone and short-term particle pollution compared to 2014-2016."

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