Trump Issues Temporary Plan To End Government Shutdown

Trump is ready to shut the government down again if he does not receive funding for a border wall. 

The government shut down is slightly officially over.

On Friday (Jan. 25), President Donald Trump says his deal will fund the government for three weeks (February 15) while a bipartisan panel will create a border security package, CNN reports. Trump added that he has a "very powerful alternative" but will not use it. The temporary deal does not include money for the border wall.

The alternative is more than likely his thirst to declare a national emergency for his border wall. Trump mentioned furloughed workers who were without two paychecks this month will receive back pay as soon as possible.

"All Americans, I thank you," Trump said. "You are very, very special people ... When I say 'make America great again,' it could never be done without you."

Trump added he is ready to shut the government down again if he doesn't get funding for the border wall.

"So, let me be very clear: We really have no choice but to build a powerful wall or steel barrier," Trump said. "If we don't get a fair deal from Congress, the government either shut down on Feb. 15 again, or I will use the powers afforded to me under the laws and the Constitution of the United States to address this emergency."

Trump's temporary deal has headed to Congress with a plan for the House to pass unanimously after the Senate votes.

The government has been shut down for officially 34 days, with millions of Americans unable to support themselves. The shutdown has had a bit of a domino effect in America with TSA agents and other flight-related workers unable to do their jobs.

Bloomberg reports because of the shutdown, the Federal Aviation Administration says there have been “a slight increase in sick leave” with fewer employees available to guide air traffic. The Washington Center, not in New York but handles traffic in the south and the northeast many flights heading into New York, has led to the shut down of The Laguardia Airport in New York.

“We’ve mitigated the impact by augmenting staffing, rerouting traffic, and increasing spacing between aircraft as needed,” the FAA said in an emailed statement. “The results have been minimal impacts to efficiency while maintaining consistent levels of safety in the national airspace system.”

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