Premiere: Show Tyme, Pharaohe Monch Reunite For Summer Jam "T.Y.L.A. (Remix)"

With multiple gems created together over more than a decade, singer Show Tyme and rap legend Pharoahe Monch have reunited for a new summer jam, "T.Y.L.A. (Remix)."

Monch and Show Time and emcee have been frequent collaborators on several of the Queens lyricist's most renowned songs, including "Desire," "Push," "Clap (One Day)," and more. So this time around, he returns the the favor by blessing a remix of a song from Show Tyme's debut album Love Truth, out now on W.A.R. Media/Cold Rain.

"Show Tyme is an incredible singer and one of the best performers I’ve ever been associated with, and it’s my honor to return the favor to him as he has graced many of my favorite songs in my career," Pharoahe Monch told VIBE.

Show Tyme told VIBE that he wanted to resurrect the feeling of his favorite songs from the 90s.

“With T.Y.L.A. I wanted to deliver a remix reminiscent of the 90’s R&B merged with hip hop, like the Bad Boy and So So Def mixes,"he said. "I think we got us one.”

T.Y.L.A. remix is available on all platforms now.

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Little Brother

Little Brother Releases "May The Lord Watch," First Album In Nine Years

After years of fans restlessly begging for a reunion, North Carolina rap group Little Brother has released their first album in nearly a decade.

At midnight, Phonte and Big Pooh released the new Litle Brother album May the Lord Watch on digital service providers. The album clocks in at 15 tracks and 37 minutes, with the lion's share of production handled by fellow Justus League member and frequent collaborator Khrysis, Focus and Nottz, with more beats by Black Milk, Abjo, Devin Morrison, Blaaq Gold, and King Michael Coy. A glance at the tracklist appears to show that there are no guest appearances, but this story will be updated with further details. In an Instagram post, Rapper Big Pooh referred to the record as "the album of our careers."

 

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Listen, man. It took us a long time to get it right but we did. I love the fact we accomplished the goal but it’s the journey that I’ll always cherish the most. We wrote and recorded every song on this album together. We carried each other. We give y’all the album of our careers, “May The Lord Watch” . . Thank you to everyone that contributed to this album. It wouldn’t have turned out the same way without y’all. (I’ll drop the credits later. I got some champagne to drink) #LBbizness #MTLW #availablenow

A post shared by Rapper Pooh (@rapperbigpooh) on Aug 19, 2019 at 9:15pm PDT

Phonte and Big Pooh announced in May that they would be coming back together for a new record, albeit without the production of founding member 9th Wonder, who gave the group his blessing while he continued other projects. Since then, the duo has released a documentary about their surprise live reunion at the 2018 Art of Cool Festival in their home state, which was revealed to have been the spark for their idea to make a new album. Since then, they have stayed relatively mum on details until Aug 19, when they surprised fans with the title, the album cover, and the news that the album would be dropping at midnight.

Little Brother released their debut album The Listening in 2003, before landing a record deal with Atlantic Records and releasing their acclaimed sophomore album The Minstrel Show in 2005. They released two more albums, Getback (2007) and Leftback (2010), before parting ways for their own musical endeavors. Phonte has since made solo albums and group albums with producer Nicolay as the Grammy-winning duo Foreign Exchange, Rapper Big Pooh has released solo albums, and 9th Wonder founded what would become It's A Wonderful World Music Group, which features artists including Grammy-nominated MC Rapsody..

Stream May the Lord Watch on Apple Music, TIDAL, or below on Spotify.

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Get Ready: A Three 6 Mafia Reunion Tour Is On The Way

Three 6 Mafia is on their way to a stage near you. According to an Instagram post from Juicy J, the popular hip-hop collective will be performing at a series of very special reunion shows.

Per the flyer, one of the shows will be held on Oct. 12 at the Landers Center in Mississippi. The show will also star DJ Paul, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, DMX and all original Hypnotize Minds & HCP Members (Gangsta Boo, Crunchy Black, Project Pat, Lil Wyte and La. Chat).

“I know this is what the fans have been asking for, so we're ready to bring them the classics, along with our new music in the best possible way,” said DJ Paul in a statement. “To quote LL, don't call it a comeback, we have officially been here for years, and we've got a lot to show for it. Just wait to see what comes next.”

The Oscar-winning group went on a hiatus back in 2012. Many of the group’s members have released solo projects, and two of the group’s founding members have since passed on (Koopsta Knicca and Lord Infamous).

Tickets to the event will be on sale this Friday (Aug. 23). Take a look at the flyer below.

DATES 09-07 Atlanta, GA - One Musicfest 10-11 Newark, NJ - Loud Records 25th Anniversary (Prudential Center) 10-12 Southaven, MS - Landers Center

 

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THREE 6 MAFIA REUNION TOUR! Tickets on sale next Friday August 23rd @landerscenter

A post shared by Juicy J (@juicyj) on Aug 16, 2019 at 12:37pm PDT

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Paul Elliot

Matt Muse Raps His Heart Out On 'Love & Nappyness'

Matt Muse used to hate love songs. Last fall, the Chicago rapper asked his Instagram followers what they’d like to see on his next project, and they answered resoundingly with demand for more songs like “Shea Butter Baby,” a hip-house love song that was a highlight of 2018’s Nappy Talk. “I think love songs are mad corny, so I was like ‘Hell naw,’” he laughs over the phone. “But then I’m thinking, ‘They told you their answer. What is a way I can satisfy this desire?’” Muse then faced the challenge of delving into love songs without repeating himself or regurgitating cliches.

Love & Nappyness, Matt Muse’s new project, explores love from all angles: romantic, but also platonic, familial, even spiritual. It’s an ambitious undertaking, but Muse succeeds through sharp writing and soulful production. It’s the best work yet by a rising artist in Chicago’s fertile hip-hop scene.

The rapper born Dexter Matthews found inspiration for the album in his church’s annual Agape Festival. “The festival was everybody feasting together in the basement of our church celebrating love,” he says. Included in the program were Greek and Biblical terms for various kinds of love that provided a framework as Muse wrote his verses and eventually became subtitles for each track. “Love doesn’t just exist in this vacuum of intimate relationships. It actually exists in all these other ways too,” he says.

The South Side rapper was careful to avoid the corniness he sees inherent to the love songs churned out by pop songwriters for “anybody who can look good and sing well.” “The way I automatically combat that corniness is the nappyness,” Muse explains. “It’s real, it’s me, it’s genuine. Everything I talk about in every one of these songs is one million percent real to me.” The EP’s title is less an Al Green reference than a celebration of freedom from external expectations, symbolized by his natural hair.

On the project’s first track, “St. Matthew (Agape),” Muse raps directly to God. “Now me at 26, 10 years from you / But searching for a verse to keep the congregation moved / Guess we ain’t that far removed but I’m still stuck & still confused.” I’d recommend that!Though he grew up intending to be a preacher, he stopped believing entirely after processing the deaths of loved ones in his teens. His distance from divinity is the heart of the song, where he laments earthly racism and disloyalty while admitting his own mistakes. It’s a credit to Muse’s pen that he balances the heavy subject matter with moments of levity, like when he imagines that God will “probably reply ‘Same phone, who dis?’” Muse stresses that his lack of religious beliefs didn’t divide him from his churchgoing family. “I still be pulling up to the church sometimes, people don’t treat me any different.”

Muse continues his family’s musical tradition, as he explains on “Family, Still (Storge).” He raps that his “mom’s in twenty-something choirs,” while his father, stage name Big Ed, has produced house music and rapped all his life. (One of his songwriting credits, Barbara Tucker’s “I Get Lifted,” was recently sampled by a house tribute from a fellow Chicagoan: Kanye West’s “Fade.”) Muse’s music career was kickstarted by an eighth-grade graduation gift from his dad, a drum machine. His younger brother raps and produces as well under the name Syl Messi, a fitting name because “his room still be dirty but his beats be kicking.”

The song concludes with Muse harmonizing to Mon’Aerie singing a yearning melody: “Rest your head and your heart / I’ll keep the family near.” The Chicago singer’s warm vocals add extra flavor all over the EP. “If I’m the heart and brains,” Muse says, “she’s the body.”

Though he initially planned against featuring any guest rappers, Muse tapped Pivot Gang member Joseph Chilliams for a verse on “Myself (Philautia II).” The song shares a subtitle with “Ain’t No,” which is a dexterous boast like vintage Lupe Fiasco, but “Myself” is about self-love in a physical sense. “Love how you treat me baby,” Muse sings on the hook. “But first let me treat myself.” As the sugary sweet beat dissolves to drums, Chilliams raps “Looking in the mirror, I just gotta thank the lord / In love with myself just like Regina George.” Chilliams is familiar with showing his feelings, his humor and his Mean Girls knowledge, dating back to past projects like The Plastics and Henry Church. “Listening to Joseph Chilliams’ music was a huge inspiration for me to even be comfortable being as vulnerable as I am on this song,” Muse says. “To me, he embodies self-love in the way he raps.”

Muse addresses romantic love on “Love Wrong (Eros),” a sequel of sorts to “Shea Butter Baby.” If the fan-favorite track depicted puppy love, “Love Wrong” documents the same relationship later, as the two navigate disagreement and miscommunication. “Both songs are about the same real person. ‘Love Wrong’ is a more in-depth analysis of what her and I have experienced since being involved with each other,” Muse says. “The realities of it, like ‘Oh we gotta learn each other, this sh*t doesn’t just work overnight,’” he continues. The song ends on a hopeful note, as he chants “We gon get it right” like a mantra to get through the tough times. Muse is still seeing the woman who inspired both songs, after all.

Perseverance through discord and death is the common thread through Love & Nappyness, the same grit in the face of adversity that drives hometown heroes like Kanye and Common. Muse is releasing his latest work independently, and he passed up opportunities to play festivals in order to book the release show, his first time headlining. For him, the payoff has been worth it. “The whole theme of my year,” he says, “has been betting on myself.”

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