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4 Things To Know About California's "Fair Pay to Play Act" That Benefits Collegiate Athletes

Here are four takeaways from California's foray into the world of collegiate sports.

There's a new order on the horizon in the world of collegiate sports and it begins with California. On Monday (Sept. 30), the state's Gov. Gavin Newsom authorized the "Fair Pay to Play Act" that grants student-athletes the opportunity to profit off of their likeness and hire agents. That means a student at a California-based university or college can entertain endorsements without being penalized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The bill is set to go into effect in January 2023.

The NCAA also issued a statement citing there's confusion brewing within the collegiate sports sphere. "As more states consider their own specific legislation related to this topic, it is clear that a patchwork of different laws from different states will make unattainable the goal of providing a fair and level playing field for 1,100 campuses and nearly half a million student-athletes nationwide," the statement reads. In 2017, the NCAA surpassed $1 billion in revenue for the first time.

Here are four takeaways from California's foray into the world of collegiate sports.

What Restrictions Are Now Placed On The NCAA?
This leaves the NCAA without the power to ban an athlete or their respective university from a competition. California's student-athletes will gain the opportunity to market their name and likeness "to outside bidders." Community colleges, however, remain exempt from the state's law.

Other States Plan To Get In On The Action:
Earlier this month, Brooklyn, New York's Sen. Kevin Parker recently advocated for the state to mandate that colleges pay its athletes, citing equity as the main root. "These young people are adding their skill, talent and labor to these universities," Parker said per ESPN. "You don't need the shortcuts and the end-arounds because now we're providing some real support for these student-athletes." Parker's legislation would require a collegiate school's athletic department to disperse 15 percent of its yearly ticket revenue to its athletes.

Before California's bill, the NCAA allowed tennis players to receive prize money no more than $10,000. Other student-athletes within the "Power 5" also are eligible to receive anywhere between $2,000-$4,000 in "cost-of-living stipends." The Power 5 conferences include SEC, Big Ten, Pac-12, ACC, and Big Twelve.

Professional Athletes Previously Voiced Concern Over The NCAA's Restrictions:
In February 2018, LeBron James scrutinized the NCAA's longstanding practice of not compensating athletes and referred to it as a "corrupt" company following a string of college basketball recruiting investigations. James even produced a documentary on the NCAA that highlights the astronomical salaries paid to coaches and secret endorsements.

"I do know what five-star athletes bring to a campus, both in basketball and football. I know how much these college coaches get paid. I know how much these colleges are gaining off these kids," he said per ESPN. "I've always heard the narrative that they get a free education, but you guys are not bringing me on campus to get an education, you guys are bringing me on it to help you get to a Final Four or to a national championship, so it's just a weird thing."

While California's bill also allows athletes the right to seek out an agent, the NCAA tried to get ahead by implementing a rule stating agents who express interest in student-athletes looking to enroll in the NBA draft must have a three-year certification with the league, take a test at the organization's main office, and must've graduated with a bachelor's degree.

NCAA Believes California's Decision Will Blur The Lines Between Amateur And Professional Athletes:
The Associated Press notes being a part of the NCAA is voluntary, meaning if the organization begins to impose bans or further restrictions on universities and colleges in California, those schools have the ability to part ways from the company and possibly form its own league. The NCAA took issue with the state's ruling stating the playing field will become uneven. “Right now, nearly half a million student-athletes in all 50 states compete under the same rules,” a statement reads. “This bill would remove that essential element of fairness and equal treatment that forms the bedrock of college sports.”

The organization reportedly asked California's legislatures to remain steady on passing the bill so that its committee can review its own mandate that allows collegiate athletes a similar opportunity.

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The Weeknd just reached a career milestone. The Canadian singer will headline the Super Bowl LV halftime show, it was announced on Thursday (Nov. 12).

"We all grow up watching the world's biggest acts playing the Super Bowl and one can only dream of being in that position,” said The Weeknd. “I’m humbled, honored and ecstatic to be the center of that infamous stage.”

performing on the iconic stage. see you 02/07/21 @pepsi #pepsihalftime #SBLV pic.twitter.com/oYlQyvKRwh

— The Weeknd (@theweeknd) November 12, 2020

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“The Weeknd has ushered in a sound all his own. His soulful uniqueness has defined a new generation of greatness in music and artistry,” JAY-Z said. “This is an extraordinary moment in time and the Pepsi Super Bowl LV Halftime Show is going to be an extraordinary experience with an extraordinary performer.”

The “Blinding Lights” singer joins Beyoncé, Bruno Mars, Lady Gaga, Jennifer Lopez, Shakira, Prince, Katy Perry, Madonna, and other music stars who have performed at halftime.

Super Bowl LV will live on CBS on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021.

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Michael Jordan Reveals Plans To Launch NASCAR Team Next Year

Michael Jordan is beefing up his resume. The NBA legend and business mogul has added NASCAR team owner to his list of accolades.

Jordan is partnering with three-time Daytona 500 winner, Denny Hamlin, to launch the team in 2021. Bubba Wallace has been tapped as a driver.

In an interview with NBC Sports, Jordan spoke about how the collaboration came together and confirmed that he’ll be just as competitive in NASCAR as he was in basketball. “It was one of those things, again, it’s always been on my mind,” he said of owning a team. “I go with my gut feeling. When the time is right you know it. When this was presented to me, I felt good about it. When Bubba was involved in the whole conversation I felt good about it.”

Jordan continued, “My biggest conversation with Denny was, ‘Look, I don’t want to get in there to just go around the races and just go around and around and around and finish up 18th, 19th, 20th, 30th. I want to win. I want to be put in a position for the best chance for us to win. That’s my competitive nature. That’s always been who I am.”

As one of only two Black co-owners for a Cup team (the first is Brad Duagherty) and the first Black majority owner in NASCAR, Jordan hopes to provide more opportunities for Black people in the sport.

“To me, you’re basically diving into a situation where very few Black people have been present into the NASCAR arena. In essence, you’re going in with the opportunity to expand that and to give a different lens to NASCAR as a whole,” he explained. “For so long, it’s been viewed from a negative aspect with the Confederate flag and all these other things that occurred.

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When WNBA star Maya Moore first met her now husband, Jonathan Irons, their relationship was strictly platonic. Things changed after she helped to get his wrongful conviction overturned, and the happy couple recently tied the knot.

“We wanted to announce today that we are super excited to continue the work that we are doing together, but doing it as a married couple,” Moore told Good Morning America on Wednesday (Sept. 16). “We got married a couple months ago and we're excited to just continue this new chapter of life together.”

Catch us tomorrow on @GMA with @RobinRoberts! #winwithjustice pic.twitter.com/0z1B1RRS2b

— Maya Moore (@MooreMaya) July 2, 2020

Irons was 16 years old when he was tried as an adult and falsely convicted by an all white jury and sentenced to 50 years for a burglary and shooting. He maintained his innocence throughout, but he would have never been convicted had the case been handled properly. Aside from being wrongfully identified in a lineup, fingerprint evidence that could have proved his innocence was withheld from his lawyers. After serving 23 years for a crime he did not commit, Irons' conviction was overturned in March.

Moore, 31, has known Irons, 40, since she was 18 years old. The two met through a prison ministry program and their relationship slowly transitioned from a friendship to romance. Irons confessed his love for Moore while incarcerated at Missouri's Jefferson City Correctional Center. “I wanted to marry her but at the same time protect her because being in a relationship with a man in prison, it's extremely difficult and painful. And I didn't want her to feel trapped and I wanted her to feel open and have the ability any time if this is too much for you, go and find somebody. Live your life. Because this is hard.”

He popped the question in their hotel room following his prison release. “It was just me and her in the room and I got down on my knees and I looked up at her and she kind of knew what was going on and I said, ‘will you marry me,’ she said, ‘yes.’”

Moore, a small forward for the Minnesota Lynx, is taking a break from basketball and has been working alongside her husband to encourage people to vote. The newlyweds also plant to advocate for others who have been wrongfully convicted.

See more on their love story in the video below.

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