Ride Through Queensburg Projects With Bo Trill In "Queensburg Baby" Video

To so many young black men and women, hip-hop is much more than entertainment. Hip-hop is real life; the guns, violence, sex, drug sales, drug addiction, and bravado. Too many of us black men are so hurt, frustrated and disconnected from society that we need something, anything to hold on to. And for us, hip-hop is the one thing that we can own and connect to.

Today (Nov. 12), I ran across a video titled "Queensburg Baby" by Bo Trill. Trill, a rapper from the Laurel, MS., which is also my hometown, follows the well-worn path of spitting lyrics about hustling, gun-play and bagging someone's girl. Nothing is wrong with this. And if you know me, then you know how much I enjoy gangsta music, accurate gangsta music. Hip-hop comes from the streets, and unfortunately many of us black and latino men understanding is rooted in street politics and language. So much of what I know about life comes from the streets; the streets of Laurel.

With Unoski TV working the camera lens, viewers get a glimpse of these, well, Queensburg babies (no pun intended). QB is a small section in South Laurel. Here, in these grimy visuals, seeing these QB shorties brandishing guns bigger that are Lil Bow Bow, I was damn near moved to tears. From my 31st floor office in Times Square, I watched Bo Trill's "Queensburg Baby," looking at the faces of these young men, I literally remembered the countless nights, and days that I sold crack, cocaine and pills with some of these guys family members. Their OG's are my homies.

Seeing Bo Trill and his fellow-Queensburg Babies, as well as their aggression, machoism, their honest ignorance, and the urgency to trap dollars, and desperately hold on to something in this white man's world, I feel that shit. I totally understand everything about these Queensburg babies. They are from the city that sent me to prison.

I'll probably get in trouble for this post in the morning, but I'm from the streets of Laurel, trouble is what I do. I'll accept whatever trouble follows, if any, because what Bo Trill has to say, and what he doesn't have to language to say it, is just as important as what Kendrick Lamar and J.Cole has to say. And, I'm in a position to give a voice to the voiceless.  And more importantly, once the homies in Laurel see this video on Vibe.com, this small, what's a small feat to many, is big for my city, and just one more thing that we, Laurel babies have to hold on to.

Watch "Queensburg Baby" above.

Rest easy Justin "Muncy" Mack, and major salute to my OG, Larry Locc.

.

From the Web

More on Vibe

Video Premiere: Steff Reed Takes A "Stand" In Self-Awareness And Strength In Unity

Some artists have to announce that they are artists, be they music or visual art producers. But that wasn't the case when Steff Reed visited our office in June of 2018. He and his rapping homie Dupree G.O.D (formerly known as Word Spit of America's Got Talent success fame) come through our doors looking like the stars they are. Both did an incredible live performance of Dupree's newest song at the time, "Take Me Away," acoustic style. With Dupree on the vicious vocals and Reed on the guitar, the pair gave us an energetic but soulful performance.

Fast forward to now, and Steff Reed is releasing his newest video for the song, "Stand" off his The Power of Love Experience EP. Being one to have worked with the best in the music biz, Reed has songwriting and production credits with Swizz Beatz, Jhene Aiko and so many more that have shaped his acute style of free spirit and socially ground sounds.

"Stand inspired me to express resistance in a very symbolic way," says Reed. "I wanted to show that even though we all have our own personal battles we are stronger when we are united and we should fight in the war together." Strong words from a gentle and loving soul. Watch the video, then listen to the EP below.

Continue Reading

New Video: Saint Jhn and Lenny Kravitz Want No "Borders" With Their Women

When one gets into the music industry, the dreams and aspirations that have followed them rarely get accomplished or attained how they envision it happening. However, Saint Jhn's dream of working with Lenny Kravitz is a vision turned reality. Jhn's alias is Ghetto Lenny, it's also the name of his album, released on L.A. Reid's HitCo label, Ghetto Lenny's Love Songs. 

So the love is there and the creative chemistry hit sparks with the song they collab'd on titled "Borders." Here we find the legend and the future speaking to the ladies like, "Baby, dance closer Baby, come close to me, don't create borders/Take me in comfortably, don't be difficult/Baby girl, who hurt you? Don't be miserable/Baby, let me love you, baby dance closer..."

Check the artfully shot video and give the track some spins, along with Saint Jhn's dope album. Some dreams do come true.

Continue Reading

Premiere: Lambo Anlo Praises Women Hustlers In 'Blac Chyna' Video

Stripper-turned-entrepreneur Blac Chyna is one of the more polarizing figures in black music and reality TV, but Washington DC artist Lambo Anlo pays homage to her in his new video.

On "Blac Chyna," Lambo uses melodic rhymes to tell the story of a woman who uses her hustle, her beauty and her body to go from "section 8 to a palace." He speaks from a place of admiration for her focus, and the visual is a one shot video that shows him playing piano as the backdrop for a crew of gorgeous women of different complexions.

"It's the story of a female who grew up in an impoverished environment, taking any step she can to get where she wants to be in life," Lambo Anlo told VIBE. "For the video, we wanted to showcase the various cultures and races of women that go through this same struggle."

"I wanted to make an intimate video that juxtaposes two different types of people in more of a veiled style than what's traditionally expected," director Dillon Dowdell told VIBE.

Yazid Britt, director for creative services and marketing at Rostrum Records, noted that instead of simply casting a lookalike of the song's namesake as the lead, they wanted to go deeper and connect with viewers.

"It was an easy suggestion to just place a literal version of Blac Chyna as the female lead, but in many cases people see themselves through celebrities and that's what we set out with director Dillon Dowdell. There is a Blac Chyna in every culture.”

Watch the video for "Blac Chyna" above.

Continue Reading

Top Stories